Best Practice: Separating Egg Yolks and Whites

Sometimes I forget how much information I have trapped in my head, culinary-wise…..

I was reading a friends experience in the kitchen in which a recipe of eggs had to be tossed because the yolks broke into the whites, causing the entire egg portion of the recipe to be discarded.

While reading this, my bakers heart broke into a bakers dozen and I thought that this would be a great opportunity to begin a BEST PRACTICES Series starting with yolk and white egg separation.

First we will need three bowls, a scale, the eggs for the recipe and at least two small containers for storage

First we will need an egg separator, four bowls of equal weight, a scale that measures in ounces, the COLD eggs for the recipe and at least two small containers for storage along with freezer tape and a permanent marker

 

It is much easier to separate refrigerated eggs than eggs at room temperature.  If the recipe calls for room temperature eggs, simply cover with plastic wrap and wait until the desired temperature is reached.

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I empty the eggs onto the counter, making sure they don’t roll to their demise on to the floor.

I then use the bowl closest to me to place the egg separator and to crack each egg into the separator.

Rose Levy Beranbaum recommends tapping the egg on a few paper towels placed on the counter for:

A) easy clean up and

B) she finds that the eggs break cleaner.

( I can’t recall where I read this, in one of her baking books, her blog or somewhere else, but I do recall it was from Rose.)

The main technique here is to use four bowls:

  1. The bowl in the far background is used to calibrate or tare the weight.  Turn the scale on and place the empty bowl on the scale.  Select the Tare feature to reset the weight to zero.  Place your first bowl containing the egg yolk or whites onto the scale and remove the empty bowl.  Repeat for either the yolks and the whites.
  2. The bowl pictured with the egg separator is used as a “cracking station” and each egg is separated there AWAY from the clean egg yolks and egg whites in the remaining two bowls
  3. The third bowl is for the yolks
  4. The forth bowl is for the whites

The Example Recipe calls for:

YOLKS 2.6 oz

WHITES 5.3 oz

using 4 large eggs, plus one additional egg white

After separating four eggs, I only had .51 oz. I find it is better to lean on the "heavy" side rather than the lighter weight, so....

After separating the eggs, I only had .51 oz. I find it is better to lean on the “heavy” side rather than the lighter weight, so….

I cracked another egg and added until the scale tipped above my goal; you can always remove the whites to reach your desired recipe goal

I cracked another egg and added until the scale tipped above my goal; you can always remove the whites to reach your desired recipe goal

same with the yolks

same with the yolks

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I then pour any excess yolk / white into it's own freezer container using the same tare technique and I weigh the egg product, date it and store it away for another use

I then pour any excess yolk / white into it’s own freezer container using the same tare technique and I weigh the egg product, date it and store it away for another use

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I then keep my “Martha Stewart inventory” of egg products by date on my freezer door

I sure hope that you have found this technique to be helpful! 

Please let me know if you have any baking questions at:

OneCrumbAtAThyme@comcast.net

 

 Please copy and paste my email address above to your email – can’t get the email address to link this evening …..

 

HAPPY BAKING YA’LL!

 

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