Sugar Rose Brioche

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This recipe is from Rose Levy Beranbaum’s new baking book:

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HOW IT WORKS:

Each week we as Alpha Bakers, are assigned one of the recipes from Rose’s new baking book and we as a group all over the world bake the same recipe at the same time.  Our objective is to share our successes, where we got stumped, what questions did we have along the way, our joys and in some cases our baking shortcomings.

FAIR WARNING:

PER MY WEB HOST, in order to leave a comment on my site, you will need to click on the title of the blog each week.  It opens into a new blog window in which comments are able to be left at the bottom of the blog. Thank you all for your comments!

FULL DISCLOSURE: This week did slightly cheat and added 1/8 teaspoon Mace to the cinnamon-sugar mixture but other than that I did  follow the recipe verbatim. One other thing…I did not read the recipe close enough and only made one batch of the recipe not the double amount listed.  By the time I realized this omission, the dough was on 1.5 day rise

I laugh when I make brioche now because I do it so well….I only say that because when we made brioche in culinary school it did not excite me. I recall actually saying to myself, ….

“All that butter and not a slight major difference in taste”

That is until I used Rose’s base recipe for brioche

Rose uses a SPONGE or dough starter, and I always use her optional [1 hour room temperature rise then a 24 hour cold rise in the refrigerator] method to develop the pungently, sweet taste from the sponge development.  In school, we were always rushed and I honestly do not recall that the recipe we were told to use took advantage of a dough starter;

Such a Pity as …

THAT was supposed to be my

Culinary Baking EDUCATION.

I have said time and time again, that the bake-a-long is far superior to the culinary baking education I received in that the details that Rose celebrates in each of her recipes would never be found in a culinary baking class because there is simply not enough time given per subject to focus on those important details.  These details of Rose’s recipes consistently make the end product far superior to the fast and volume based industry product.

Enough of my rant…..

Here’s what we did….

Classic Brioche Dough Starter SPONGE Mise en Place

Classic Brioche Dough Starter SPONGE Mise en Place

We mixed the ingredients either by hand or using the stand mixer to incorporate air.

Gold Metal Bread Flour measured by oz

Gold Metal Bread Flour measured by oz

Water at mid level of recipe range in temperature so the yeast is happy

Water at mid level of recipe range in temperature so the yeast is happy

Sponge is covered while the flour blanket is prepared

Mise en Place for the dough

Mise en Place for the dough / flour blanket

Flour blanket is sprinkled over the sponge and covered tightly and placed in the warming environment for an hour; then off for the cold refrigerator rise for up to 24 hours

Flour blanket is sprinkled over the sponge and covered tightly and placed in the warming environment for an hour; then off for the cold refrigerator rise for up to 24 hours

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Sponge is peaking out from the blanket after the cold rise

Sponge is peaking out from the blanket after the cold rise

Continuation of the dough Mise en Place

Continuation of the dough Mise en Place

Softened butter is added tablespoon at a time until incorporated; I choose to scrape down the inside of the bowl after each addition in order to guarantee full incorporation

Softened butter is added one tablespoon at a time until incorporated; I choose to scrape down the inside of the bowl after each addition in order to guarantee full incorporation

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Dough is then transferred to the oiled proofing vessel and measured by volume, then marked to show when the dough has doubled in size

Dough is then transferred to the oiled proofing vessel and measured by volume, then marked to show when the dough has doubled in size

Dough has reached it's goal

Dough has reached it’s goal

Dough is then chilled for an hour so that the butter will solidify then deflated - the scent is utterly amazing

Dough is then chilled for an hour so that the butter will solidify then deflated – the scent is utterly amazing

The dough is then returned to the refrigerator for another hour

Dough is rolled into a rectangle and then a business tri-fold is preformed

Dough is rolled into a rectangle and then a business tri-fold is preformed twice

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The dough is then shaped into a circle and covered loosely with plastic wrap; I choose to use two pieces of plastic wrap to secure the dough; Notice how the dough rises again in the refrigerator after two days

The dough is then shaped into a circle and covered loosely with plastic wrap; I choose to use two pieces of plastic wrap to secure the dough; Notice how the dough rises again in the refrigerator after two days

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Now our Sugar Rose Brioche begins…..

A room temperature egg and fine sea salt are combined then left to strain

A room temperature egg and fine sea salt are combined then left to strain

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 As I was only using half of the mixture, I still measured the egg mixture so that I would only use half for the next step

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Half the superfine sugar was measured and here is where I added the Mace to the Cinnamon

Half the superfine sugar was measured and here is where I added the Mace to the Cinnamon

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Oven preheated and the dough was taken out of the cold environment as the baking pan was prepared per the recipe instructions

Oven preheated and the dough was taken out of the cold environment as the baking pan was prepared per the recipe instructions

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Dough was rolled into a circle by half

Dough was rolled into a circle by half

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Egg was was lightly brushed on the dough circle and the Cinnamon, Sugar and Mace were sifted onto the egg washed area

Egg was was lightly brushed on the dough circle and the Cinnamon, Sugar and Mace were sifted onto the egg washed area

A clean kitchen ruler was used to gently roll the fluffy dough onto itself; I used the back of the covered rolling pin as a support as I dusted the excess flour off of the underside so the flour wold not mar the spice mixture

A clean kitchen ruler was used to gently roll the fluffy dough onto itself; I used the back of the covered rolling pin as a support as I dusted the excess flour off of the underside so the flour would not mar the spice mixture

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With a fresh, dry pastry brush, the flour was wiped away with each turn

With a fresh, dry pastry brush, the flour was wiped away with each turn

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The dough log was then pinched at either end and at the center seam to keep the dough together for our next step

The dough log was then pinched at either end and at the center seam to keep the dough together for our next step

Dough log is then cut in half along the seem with a very sharp chef knife, the formed into an X and then gently braided

Dough log is then cut in half along the seem with a very sharp chef knife, the formed into an X and then gently braided keeping the spice mixture on the top level at all turns and braids

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The bottom of the prepared spring form pan was eased under the center of the braided dough

The bottom of the prepared spring form pan was eased under the center of the braided dough

The braided dough was then coiled around itself

The braided dough was then coiled around itself

The sides of the pan were put back in place with the wet cake strips and covered with a butter sprayed piece of plastic placed loosely over the pan. The pan was then placed in a warming environment until doubled

The sides of the pan were put back in place with the wet cake strips and covered with a butter sprayed piece of plastic placed loosely over the pan. The pan was then placed in a warming environment until doubled

doubled

doubled

Oven to bake before turn and foil covering

Oven to bake before turn and foil covering

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Perfect Temp!

Perfect Temp!

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14 thoughts on “Sugar Rose Brioche

  1. You’re brave using mace – it’s one if the spices I feel nervous using because it’s so strong. Obviously you have the right touch, and your loaf looks lovely.

    • Catherine, I stumbled on mace when I was making speculoous cookies for the first time a few years back…I recall my mother using mace at Christmas time as a child but never engaged in the usage until that recipe I created for my version of speculoous cookies; It is strong but if you only use 1/8 teaspoon it will bring a warm undertone of exciting flavor to your dessert(s)… If you like, try that amount sometime and tell me if you feel more comfortable using mace. Thank you Catherine!

  2. Tony–i am so moved by what you wrote about my books and recipes. i didn’t know you had gone to culinary school but i’m not surprised! i really enjoyed the way you wrote about this brioche not to mention the white chocolate club med bread and other postings.

    you are heroic pulling off this complex recipe with so much going on in your life.

  3. Nice Tony! Can’t believe you did this and went to the ER. That’s really interesting about culinary school. I felt the same way after Rose’s Heavenly Cakes bake through and now with The Baking Bible we’re learning even more things about baking. Add The Bread Bible into the mix and it’s astonishing. Hopefully, cooking through Melting Pot will do the same. Temperature gadget of yours has really come in handy. The flavor of this brioche recipe is amazing. I was tempted to use cardamom along with the cinnamon so the fact you added mace gives me license to next time! I like your rolling pin tip. I do the same thing with a pastry brush after watching a zillion Martha Stewart videos. I bought a silicone brush and it works really well for these soft doughs. Hope you stay well and out of the ER for the holidays.

    • Vicki, you are such an inspiration with your baking, post, comments, referrals and just being you. I am so happy to be a part of the baking groups centered around Rose’s amazing cook and baking books. I learn so much as we tackle a new recipe and the benefit is that this wealth of baking knowledge is a template for how you think as a baker; EG; oh well we have this, so I’ll do that logic; this worked last time so what can we apply “x” to the current recipe. It also helps me develop my own recipes and I am simply honored to be engaged, inspired and accomplished. GO TEAM!

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